muscleluvr2:

oh youre a son? name 5 of your parents

(via hotboyproblems)

tumbrlplug:

*drops food and says Ctrl+Z*

(via giggle)

mishasminions:

fyspringfield:

Read it. 

IS MARS GOING TO STOP BEING A PLANET BECAUSE IT’S NAMED AFTER A CANDY COMPANY

(Source : fyspringfield, via aphfandoms)

thesmokingwolf:

Martin Freeman in the "Over The Hill" behind the Scenes

(via free-martinis)

(Source : limetraed)

ri-science:

Pettigrew Mummy
In 1834 Thomas Joseph Pettigrew or ‘Mummy Pettigrew’ as he was sometimes known, published ‘A History of Egyptian Mummies’. This volume of work is made up of his own observations and researches into his personal collection of mummies and Egyptian artefacts. It also describes the unrolling of a mummy in front of a distinguished audience at the Ri in 1833. This work has often been described as the ‘historic cornerstone of the study of Egypt in English’.


Born in London in 1791, Thomas Pettigrew undertook the study of medicine, first as assistant to his father, who was a naval surgeon, and later as an apprentice at the Borough Hospitals. He had a distinguished medical career, becoming surgeon to the Duke of Kent and the Duke of Sussex. 
From the 1830s on, Pettigrew increasingly focused on private practice and his antiquarian interests, developing an interest in Egypt and mummies. During this time he became well known in London social circles for his private parties, at which he displayed scientific curiosities, such as Egyptian mummies and Yagan’s head. 
When the British Archaeological Society was founded in 1843, Pettigrew became its founding treasurer. After his wife’s death in 1854, he retired from medicine, and focused entirely on his antiquarian interests. He died in 1865 and is buried in Brompton Cemetery, London.

This illustration shows the profile of a Graeco-Egyptian mummy, unrolled 6 April 1833 and showing the areas of the head which still held the original gilding.
A History of Egyptian Mummies by Thomas Pettigrew, 1834
Royal Institution Rare Book Collection

ri-science:

Pettigrew Mummy

In 1834 Thomas Joseph Pettigrew or ‘Mummy Pettigrew’ as he was sometimes known, published ‘A History of Egyptian Mummies’. This volume of work is made up of his own observations and researches into his personal collection of mummies and Egyptian artefacts. It also describes the unrolling of a mummy in front of a distinguished audience at the Ri in 1833. This work has often been described as the ‘historic cornerstone of the study of Egypt in English’.

Born in London in 1791, Thomas Pettigrew undertook the study of medicine, first as assistant to his father, who was a naval surgeon, and later as an apprentice at the Borough Hospitals. He had a distinguished medical career, becoming surgeon to the Duke of Kent and the Duke of Sussex.

From the 1830s on, Pettigrew increasingly focused on private practice and his antiquarian interests, developing an interest in Egypt and mummies. During this time he became well known in London social circles for his private parties, at which he displayed scientific curiosities, such as Egyptian mummies and Yagan’s head.

When the British Archaeological Society was founded in 1843, Pettigrew became its founding treasurer. After his wife’s death in 1854, he retired from medicine, and focused entirely on his antiquarian interests. He died in 1865 and is buried in Brompton Cemetery, London.

This illustration shows the profile of a Graeco-Egyptian mummy, unrolled 6 April 1833 and showing the areas of the head which still held the original gilding.

A History of Egyptian Mummies by Thomas Pettigrew, 1834

Royal Institution Rare Book Collection

(via itstengku)

flora-file:

rebutia miniscula (by flora-file)

americanartluce:

George Ault, Bright Light at Russell’s Corners, 1946, oil on canvas, Smithsonian American Art Museum, Gift of Mr. and Mrs. Sidney Lawrence
 
-Laura, Intern

americanartluce:

George Ault, Bright Light at Russell’s Corners, 1946, oil on canvas, Smithsonian American Art Museum, Gift of Mr. and Mrs. Sidney Lawrence

 

-Laura, Intern

(via americanartmuseum)

(Source : buffet)

artchipel:

Artist on Tumblr

Robert Malte Engelsmann aka Kaeghoro | on Tumblr (Germany) - If you can’t see. 148 x 210 mm (2010)

Robert Malte Engelsmann aka Kaeghoro, is an emerging visual artist
and independent designer based in Berlin. Dynamic line drawing and mixed media painting on paper are the center of his artwork. Figures and characters play the leading role, while the abstraction challenges viewer’s perception: “When i draw, I let the line decide, let the line flow. I call this drawing process ‘flowstate-drawing’.”

© All images courtesy of the artist

[more Robert Malte Engelsmann aka Kaeghoro]

likeafieldmouse:

Holger Lippmann - Perlin Scape 1 (2011)

"The Perlin Scape 1 series is based on a perlin noise algorithm, which generates color map dependent line by line sequences of either ellipses or rectangles on a 2 dimensional surface.

This software works with different keyboard input values to compose a rather painting-like image out of different color maps. These map arrays are called by random, noise and/or manual order.”